Hidden Figures
Throughout the film and in the end, the movie really touched me and gave me a good amount of solid man tears. I just have a weakness for these heroic stories underlined by the right music. In the end, the movie is very uplifting and lets you off the hook with a very good feeling - even though horrible things happened during the era the film plays at. Having said that, due to the "watered-down Disney" feeling of the film, it will not stick with me in coming years as a movie which adults have to see but it is probably a good introduction for younger age groups about segregation in the US.
Acting
Directing
Cinematography
Script
Timeless
The Good
  • Great cast in a beautiful story
  • Important story to be told
  • Uplifting movie during the sad Trump era
The Bad
  • "Disney"'ed down version of a serious issues
4.0Overall Score
Reader Rating: (0 Votes)

Off we go to our next Academy Award contender – tonight Hidden Figures was on the agenda. Without really having planned for it, I basically watched two films back-to-back portraying a similar subject matter – Thursday night, we watched The 13th (review pending) and tonight Hidden Figures. And that experience did have a significant impact on my feelings about the latter.

Without having researched the true story behind Hidden Figures – I find it incredible to tell the beautiful story of three african-american women in the midst of segregated America who against all odds in their life made it so far as to work for NASA – as educated mathematicians. And then even went further to massively influence one of the biggest milestones in US-history.

Courtesy of http://www.foxmovies.com/

Courtesy of http://www.foxmovies.com/

The film focuses from the start on its three main characters – Katherine G. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Johnson. All their stories in itself are absolutely incredible – and here is where I make the first loop back to the 13th. This movie is playing in 1961 – a time where segregation was in “full swing”. African-Americans could not use the same bathrooms, could not vote, could not attend white colleges and were not even welcome to drink from the same coffee pot as their co-workers. To still prevail in such a time as an African-American woman must have been excruciating. And so this is where I had my issues with the film in the beginning – it watered down the struggles of these women and washed it down with funny music (e.g. Katherines long walks to the bathroom) or gave it awkward funny moments between Dorothy and her supervisor. And I did have a problem with that because these were not funny little awkward moments, this was dead-on discrimination and it was awful. Having said that, I understand that the reason why the movie chose a more “watered-down” display of racial segregation was certainly to reach more audiences and not hold up a mirror to white America yet again. Coming back to the character and story-building which is a strong suit of the movie – I liked how they started out with the three friends driving over to NASA and then all going for their “different” careers and striving for their ambitions which all did not really have any direct connection but somehow came together in the end. In addition, the film did a fantastic job in working out the strengths and ambitions of each character;

  • Katherine is the math genius (whose journey certainly was the most interesting one as well as the focal one of the movie)
  • Dorothy is a leader (and the color of her skin is preventing her from actually receiving the job title of team leader – but as with a natural leader she takes on leadership on her own and is being rewared)
  • Mary is an ambitious mathematican who wants to become an engineer and despite all the obstacles her “skin color” is to her, she makes her way through it anyways

Aside from the main cast and story, the movie had a really stellar supporting cast with Kirsten Dunst, Kevin Costner and Jim Parsons who all played their roles really well and contributed to the films success.

Throughout the film and in the end, the movie really touched me and gave me a good amount of solid man tears. I just have a weakness for these heroic stories underlined by the right music. In the end, the movie is very uplifting and lets you off the hook with a very good feeling – even though horrible things happened during the era the film plays at. Having said that, due to the “watered-down Disney” feeling of the film, it will not stick with me in coming years as a movie which adults have to see but it is probably a good introduction for younger age groups about segregation in the US.

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